Jewish Learning Fellowships

 

Overview

The Jewish Learning Fellowship (JLF) is a 8-week experiential, conversational seminar for FIU students looking to deepen their understanding of Judaism & Israel on their own terms. We’re interested in asking big questions. You know, the big stuff — like Who am I? What communities am I a part of? What is worth committing myself to, and why? And we don’t purport to have any of the big answers. JLF was founded in 2007 at the Bronfman Center for Jewish Student Life at NYU. Since then, JLF has graduated over 3,000 fellows.

We make no claims about the “right” way to practice or not to practice Judaism. Our job is to help you explore the tradition in a safe space and find your own place, on your terms, in Judaism’s Great Conversation.

The Program

We offer 5 Jewish Learning Fellowships (aka JLFs) this semester. Each fellowship meets once a week, for 8 weeks, for an hour, starting in October. It is open to all FIU students and will be taught virtually, but for one class which will be taught in person at Temple Sinai. Additionally, fellows earn $200 at the end of the semester. We also invite Fellows to reflect on their big questions over a virtual 1:1 with our teachers and staff. We are looking for a small cohort, spaces are extremely limited, if you are interested, apply today!

Temple Sinai Offer

FIU HIllel and Temple Sinai of North Dade are proud to invite you to a unique partnership and opportunity. In addition to participating in regular JLF class, you can work as a madrich & earn some extra cash! As a Madrich, you will have the chance to engage in deep and challenging learning on LIfe's Big Questions with award-winning Jewish educator and musician, Rabbi David Paskin. You will also translate that learning into action by serving as a madrich/madricha (counselor) at JPaL, Temple Sinai's Jewish Play & Pray Learning Lab. Our JPaL sessions begin on Sunday, September 12 and run through the end of the summer each Sunday from 10am-12pm. Our learning with Rabbi David begins on Tuesday, October 5 and meets weekly through November 23rd. Madrichim work for one semester and may have the option to continue their work beyond that. Madrichim are paid a stipend of $300 per semester in addition to JLF's $200, so $500 in total. This is an amazing opportunity to bring your Jewish passion and joy to young children (grades 2-5) and inspire them as you are inspired by your learning.

 

Student Registration Form

Fill out the application form here. No places are guaranteed, we'll be in touch regarding your application shortly.

Community Member Registration Form

You are not an FIU student, but would love to learn some Torah? We gotcha! Fill out this quick form, and you can attend any of the sessions!

Fall Seminars:

 
"Life's Big Questions"
Tuesdays at 6:00 pm, starting October 5 at Temple Sinai (in person)
College is not only a time to meet new people or to learn the skills of a profession. It is also a time to explore some of the big questions that orient a life well-lived. Who am I? What communities am I a part of? Who am I responsible for and why? What is the difference between love, lust, and intimacy? What is worth committing myself to and why? While these are universal questions, we believe they can be illuminated through the unique light of Jewish texts and traditions. In this class we will explore the big questions of life as refracted through the Jewish tradition.


"Sex, Love, Romance"
Mondays at 1:00 pm, starting October 4 via Zoom
Sexuality and intimacy are central to our identities and experiences as human beings, yet we have few opportunities to speak about them in a frank, open, and explicitly Jewish way. In this seminar, you are expected to read — broadly and generously — traditional Jewish texts on intimacy, gender, sexuality, and other related topics. Thoughtful participation on your part requires active listening, speaking up to contribute in class, and talking from your own experience while being open to the experiences of others. This course explores the ethics of human relationships and sexuality in the Jewish tradition.


"The "Z-Word": Zionism"
Tuesdays at 3:30 pm, starting October 5 via Zoom
How might Jewish tradition inspire an ethos for how we engage with the concept of home and shared homeland? What role does location, spiritual connection, and collective history play in our narrative of home?  How do we hold personal identity in dialogue with broader historical and contemporary communal narratives? What responsibilities do we hold for the people and places we are connected to? How might we live with intention and in tension with multiple truths?  To address these enduring questions, our Israel Fellow Ron together with the students explore the diaspora relationship to Israel, looking to classical, rabbinic, and modern Jewish wisdom to engage a contemporary understanding of peoplehood, responsibility, home, and homeland.


"Israel: Home & Homeland"
Wednesdays at 6 pm, starting October 6 via Zoom
How might Jewish tradition inspire an ethos for how we engage with the concept of home and shared homeland? What role does location, spiritual connection, and collective history play in our narrative of home?  How do we hold personal identity in dialogue with broader historical and contemporary communal narratives? What responsibilities do we hold for the people and places we are connected to? How might we live with intention and in tension with multiple truths?  To address these enduring questions, our Israel Fellow Ron together with the students explore the diaspora relationship to Israel, looking to classical, rabbinic, and modern Jewish wisdom to engage a contemporary understanding of peoplehood, responsibility, home, and homeland.


"The Torah of Rick & Morty"
Thursdays at 3:00 pm, starting September 30 via Zoom with Rabbi Russ Shulkes
Rick and Morty gifts us the anti-heroes the world desperately needs and probably deserves. While our protagonists struggle against intergalactic police, tyranny, run of the mill plots, and monotonous existence, ironically their worst enemies are usually themselves. While many view Judaism’s perspective on ethics and morality as monolithic, in truth Judaism enjoys a multifaceted tradition of subversive and anarchistic ideas as well, that Rick and Morty can lend a hand in teaching us about. During our weekly conversations, we will explore concepts like meaning, evil, and the purpose of life as we welcome Ricky and Morty as our guest rabbinical guides along with a mix of text study and cartoon video clips. Wubba Lubba Torah Dub!

Please email Olga if you have any questions olga@hillelfiu.org